Steel Windows in Historical London Buildings

A Window

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This days, any windows with frames made of steel are often called steel windows. However, the old design is typically replaced by windows with frames assembled from augmented aluminium.

The classic steel windows, along with their modern equivalents, are still all the rage, even more so after the update of the design. A plethora of dwellings feature these architectural elements. To fix the noteworthy Tooting Library, constructors used numerous steel windows as one of the main elements of the process. The restoration program, which cost more than lb3 million, lasted for two years. The job was completed at the onset of 2012, with a remarkable accomplishment.

Wandsworth Mayor financed the structure, erected in 1902, faithful to the Edwardian fashion. Nowadays, more than half a million tourists arrive to visit the building every year. Nonetheless, the library needed the renovation, the interior, as well as the exterior parts alike. Architects from NPS London Ltd bureau introduced an action plan, supposed to upgrade the dated building, and enhance its energy conservation parameters.

All the aged windows, framed with steel, were to be replaced by steel windows. The profiles, slim and unassuming, provide hardiness and security, as they conserve the unique impression made by a structure. The objective of a scheme was to maintain the genuine design, while preserving any uncommon elements, such as secession style leaded lights, decorated with flowery motifs, and attached to some of the ground floor windows.

The Soho hotel , which opened in 2004, was located by the Wardour and Dean Street. It was supposed to blend into the local architecture, boasting the design similar to that of many surrounding buildings. Multiple steel-framed steel windows helped to achieve such an effect, while adding to the old-fashioned looks. The final result keeps winning curious tourists, looking for a traditional-styled place to stay.

The Grade II structure, known as a Pump House, is located on the Hopper Street in London. The City North PLC development company, which bought this building, had a problem at first. Because of the construction’s protected status, corrupted frames made of steel had to be replaced with other structures, which looked very similar to them. Steel windows saved the day, as they turned out to be a perfect replacement, which maintained the unique feel of the Pump House. Additionally, the renovated building is quite sustainable, as concerning its thermal efficiency.

In the centre of London, one can find an eight store construction, known as headquarters of the Burberry Group. This fashion house build in the 1930s in Westminster, retained its beautiful architectural details, with the unique steel windows among them. Even today, it seems quite stylish and tasteful.

A unique Portland Stone, as well as some typical steel windows, remain the main features of the redesigned office, based on 95 Gresham Street. Metal-framed windows of this East Central London structure, contrasting with the sleek Portland Stone, appear stunning. The house differentiates from its surroundings, while managing to blend flawlessly into the local architecture.

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